• J M Bell

Conway Census Results Show Lowest Percentage Growth Since Great Depression

August 26, 2021 - Originally posted by The Log Cabin Democrat


The city of Conway recently received its results from the 2020 census which showed the city having an increase of 5,226 citizens, below what estimates were projecting.


Estimates from two different sources had the city of Conway at a projected population increase somewhere between 7,300 and 8,700 people, about 3,000 higher than the results showed. In 2010 the population was 58,908 people with it now being 64,134 people, a growth of only 8.9 percent which is the lowest percentage growth Conway has seen since the Great Depression.


Despite the low percentage growth, the city is still looking at it in a positive way as it was the largest numerical growth in any city in the region outside of Little Rock. The city also saw its racial characteristics change in the census results. The Hispanic population saw the largest growth out of all racial and ethnic categories with an increase of 1,761 people, with the Black population followed closely behind with an increase of 1,527. Both the White and Asian populations in the city saw a decrease in size with the former showing the biggest drop of 1,569 people.


In terms of areas within Conway that showed the most growth, south Conway had one of the largest percentages of growth in the entire region with a growth between 30-75 percent. Central Conway near Oak and Harkrider streets was one of the few areas in the city that lost population. When looking at the universities and their effects on Conway’s population from the census results, the blocks near and around the University of Central Arkansas (UCA) saw an increase of about 12.7 percent while the blocks around Hendrix University saw a decrease of about 10.1 percent.


Despite the results not being what they hoped for and speculating that a lot of people didn’t fill out the census, city officials said they are still pleased with the Census.


See full article below:


Conway Census Results Show Lowest Percentage Growth Since Great Depression






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